17th Century

ELIZABETH WORMELEY KEMP LUNSFORD SMITH

ELIZABETH WORMELEY KEMP LUNSFORD SMITH

By April, 1656, Elizabeth, being referred to as Lady (or Dame) Lunsford, was doing business under her own name. After all, she still had the 1200-acre Rich Neck as well as the developing new plantation. Her annual income from all that tobacco was pretty substantial.

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Those left decided they had had enough. With only a handful of people left, the desire to return to England was in most people’s minds.

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ANNE ORTHWOOD

Despite the hardship that Anne went through, she will be remembered for the attitudes of councils. Which laws the court would choose, rule by, or ignore was based on how the people in the community felt about the case being prosecuted. With criminal conduct cases, the court acted upon moral justification rather than law. In paternity cases, they acted upon the community’s best financial interests, finding a responsible party to take the burden off themselves.

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ANNE JACKSON, SURVIVOR

ANNE JACKSON, SURVIVOR

Starting in 1619, the company advertised for sensible, honest young ladies to join the men in Virginia and marry if they found someone who could attract them.

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CECILY RANDOLPH JORDAN FARRAR

CECILY RANDOLPH JORDAN FARRAR

CECILY REYNOLDS JORDAN FARRAR Cecily Farrar is considered the first Southern belle, the first to master flirting in Virginia. Needless to say, she was beautiful. She was also quite a good business manager. Cecily was the daughter of Joan Phippen and Thomas(?)...

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MARY DOUGHTY VON DER DONCK O’NEALE

MARY DOUGHTY VON DER DONCK O’NEALE

Mary was one of eight children of Reverend Francis and Bridget Doughty. The reverend was ostensibly an Anglican minister who seemed to always have his own opinion on how things really were and how he should preach the word of the Gospel. Many credit him with being the...

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Work, Work, Work

Work, Work, Work

Work, work, and more work. That pretty much describes the lives of the colonials, whether it was New England or Virginia. Whether you were male or female, young or old, literate or illiterate, you worked.What you worked at depended on whether you lived on a farm or in...

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